Boglily

Boglily KGH S NT254912 1 60m

(John of) Balglali 1342 CPL iii 90
(royal lands of) Balglaly Estir 1369 RMS i no. 241 [the royal lands of Balglaly Westir and Balglaly Estir in the constabulary of Kinghorn (in constabularia de Kyngorne) given by King David II to John of Abernethy]
(royal lands of) Balglaly Westir 1369 RMS i no. 241 [see preceding]
Balglaly Eastir 1369 RMS i no. 287
Balglaly Westir 1369 RMS i no. 287
(John de) Balglaly 1428 ER iv 463
(lands of) Balglalee 1458 RMS ii no. 638 [‘terras de Cragincat (Craigencalt KGH) et Balglalee’, part of the barony of Glassmount KGH]
(lands of) Balglaly-Estir (with their mill) 1500 RMS ii no. 2514
Balglelly 1518 Fife Ct. Bk. 146
Balglellye 1518 Fife Ct. Bk. 148
E. Balglilly 1642 Gordon MS Fife
W. Balglilly 1642 Gordon MS Fife
E. Bagkilly 1654 Blaeu (Pont) West Fife
W. Baglillie 1654 Blaeu (Pont) West Fife
E. Baglilly 1654 Blaeu (Gordon) Fife
W. Baglilie 1654 Blaeu (Gordon) Fife
Boglilly 1753 Roy sheet 17, 5
W. Bellilly 1753 Roy sheet 17, 5
E Boglilly 1775 Ainslie/Fife [shown in AAX]
W Boglilly 1775 Ainslie/Fife [shown in AAX]
Et. Boglillie 1828 SGF
Wt. Boglillie 1828 SGF
Boglillie 1856 OS 6 inch 1st edn. [= OS Pathf. Boglily Farm]
West Boglillie 1856 OS 6 inch 1st edn.

G baile + ? pn Gille Alaidh

The second element might well be that found in the Irish name Mullally (Ó Maolalaidh). Gille, which means ‘lad, boy’, and Maol, which means ‘(shorn) servant’, come to mean ‘devotee’ or ‘servant’ in personal names, where they usually precede a saint’s name. However, there are some examples of both Gille and Maol coupled with adjectives to form personal names (see Ó Cuív, 1986, 19–20), or adjectives used as nouns (e.g. ‘servant of the speckled one’). The second element in Maolalaidh is uncertain, but it may well be aladh ‘speckled’, presumably in the sense of ‘freckled’ (MacLysaght 1985, 226). Various other possibilities exist, however, such as allaidh ‘wild’ (i.e. from yonder, the unknown). This would be purely adjectival as the gen. is alta. If allaidh is the underlying element here, it probably refers not to wildness but to an unknown or unfamiliar aspect of the person named.[164]

The name appears on OS Pathf. as Boglily Farm, which supplies the above NGR. SGF (1828) shows E<as>t Boglillie at that NGR, and W<es>t Boglillie more than 2 km to the west. The former appears on OS 6 inch 1st edn. as Boglillie, the latter as West Boglillie at NT230905, at the east end of OS Pathf. Kinuny Plantation. OS Pathf. also shows Boglilly Braes.

/bɔgˈlɪlɪ/ or /bɔˈglɪlɪ/

This place-name appeared in printed volume 1