Oakley

Oakley CNK S NT025893 1 394 75m

Oakly 1825 Sasines no. 2279 [See discussion below]
Oakley 1856 OS 6 inch 1st edn. [applied to an area south of the modern village, on the lands of Inzievar TOB, SLN]
Oakley House 1856 OS 6 inch 1st edn. [OS Pathf. Inzievar]
Oakley Wood 1856 OS 6 inch 1st edn. [OS Pathf. Inzievar Wood]
Oakley 1899 OS 1 inch 2nd edn. [where OS Pathf. Oakley now is]
Oakley House 1899 OS 1 inch 2nd edn. [OS Pathf. Inzievar]
Oakley Wood 1899 OS 1 inch 2nd edn. [OS Pathf. Inzievar Wood]

The name first appears in 1825, when it is newly applied to Inzievar lands TOB, SLN, and is probably a transferred name imported by the then laird James Alexander Farquharson shortly before that date. The relevant Sasine entry (no. 2279) is as follows: ‘Lieut-Col. James Alexander Farquharson – in the lands and Estate of ANNFIELD in all time coming to be called the lands and Estate of OAKLY’. It goes on to describe Oakly as comprising the following lands: ‘parts of the town and lands of Wester or Over Inzievar, viz. lands of Boghead and Marytown, parts of the town and lands of Easter or Nether Inzievar, viz. lands of Herdhill, Duckhill, Gray Craigs, Damhead, Gladyside and Rimaltoun, and ground of the Dam of Inzievar with Dam Dykes and Damheads belonging to the same, piece of ground near Torryburn and parts of the Haugh of Torry, all now called the lands of Tinean of Torry; parts of the lands and Estate of Nether or Easter Inzievar, viz. lands of Langleys and Wester Broom, parts of the town and lands of Nether or Easter Inzievar extending to 60 Acres, and 5 Acres of the lands of Drumfin, par. Torry.’ This estate of Annfield appears as Anfield on Ainslie/Fife (1775) and as Annfield on SGF (1828).

The name Oakley did not move northwards to become applied to the modern village of that name until the second half of the nineteenth century. On SGF (1828) Nether Blair is the name of the small settlement around which the modern village of Oakley later developed. It was the building of the Forth Iron Works in 1845 that led to its establishment. The works closed in 1869, but the opening up of coal-mines nearby on an industrial scale towards the end of the nineteenth century ensured the continuity of the settlement at Oakley and neighbouring Comrie CUS (Webster 1938, 116–17). The Oakley Iron Works was the alternative name for the Forth Iron Works (Groome’s Gazetteer (New Edition)).

/ˈoklɪ/

This place-name appeared in printed volume 1