Markinch

Markinch MAI PS NO297019 1 373 70m

(church of) Marckinch c.1028 x 1055 St A. Lib. 116 [rubric]
(church of) Marchinke c.1028 x 1055 St A. Lib. 116 [granted to Lochleven; see MAI Introduction]
Marchinche 1152 x 1156 St A. Lib. 43 [20 mela of cheese and 1 pig from Markinch belonging to Lochleven, now granted to Robert, prior of St Andrews]
(church of) Markynche 1165 x 1169 St A. Lib. 175 [with its kirkton (villa ecclesiastica), one of possessions of Lochleven granted to St Andrews priory]
(church of) Marcinche 1165 x 1169 St A. Lib. p. xxi [granted to St Andrews Priory by Aodh son of Aodh son of Gillemhìcheil (Hugo filius Hugonis filii Gillemich<el>) earl of Fife: for whom see MAI Introduction, Multiple Rights in the Church]
(church of) Marchinch 1165 x 1169 St A. Lib. 135 [rubric]
(church of) Marchinche 1165 x 1169 St A. Lib. 135–6 [confirmed by Bishop Richard to St Andrews Priory, no donor specified]
ecclesiam de Markinke 1165 x 1169 RRS ii no. 28 [o.c.; royal confirmation of grant made by Aodh son of Aodh (Hugh) son of Gillemhìcheil earl of Fife of the church of Markinch with a toft (tofta) on the east side of the church, with teinds and all rights belonging to the church; see MAI Introduction, Multiple Rights in the Church, for more details]
apud Marking 1172 Stringer 1985 no. 28 [o.c.]
Hugone clerico nostro de Markinch 1173 x 1173 x 1178 St A. Lib. 241 [Hugh of Markinch, Duncan earl of Fife’s clerk]
(church of) Marchinch 1173 x 1178 St A. Lib. 242 [granted to St Andrews Priory by Earl Duncan II of Fife]
ecclesiam de Marking 1173 x 1178 NLS Adv.15.1.18 no. 67 [o.c.; St A. Lib. 244 represents the same charter, with the same form; confirmation by Malcolm of the churches of Cupar, Markinch, Scoonie and the chapel of Kettle, all granted to St Andrews Priory by his father Earl Duncan of Fife]
(church of) Markinge 1173 x 1178 RRS ii no. 151 [ = St A. Lib. 220]
(church of) Marchinge 1183 St A. Lib. 59
(church of) Marchinche (with chapel of Katel) 1189 x 1195 RRS ii no. 333
(church of) Marking 1189 x 1198 St A. Lib. 151
(church of) Marching 1189 x 1198 St A. Lib. 152 [confirmed twice in one charter, by Bishop Roger elect of St Andrews]
ecclesi<a> Modhrusti de Markinge 1204 x 1228 St A. Lib. 245 (1) [gift by Earl Malcolm I of Fife to the church of St Drost(an) of Markinch of 1 toft of 1 acre on the north-east side of its cemetery (unum toftum unius acre in orientali ab aquilonali parte cimiterii eiusdem ecclesie)]
(church of) Markinge 1206 St A. Lib. 73
(church of) Marking 1224 St A. Lib. 327 [dispute with church of Kilgour FAL re teinds of Pittenchagill # MAI; see MAI Introduction]
(church of) Marchynche 1243 St A. Lib. 348 [of St. John the Baptist and St Modrustus (Modrusti)]
(church of) Markinge 1248 St A. Lib. 103 [papal confirmation]
(cains from) Markinche 1248 St A. Lib. 121 [part of barony of Kirkness PTM]
(cains of) Markinch 1248 St A. Lib. 178-9
(church of) Markinge c.1250 St A. Lib. 33
(church of) Markinge c.1250 Dunf. Reg. no. 313
(church of) Markinge c.1250 Arb. Lib. i, no. 299
vicarius de Marking 1276 Bagimond’s Roll, p. 61
(cains of) Marchinche 1279 x 1297 St A. Lib. 177
Marchynche 1284 St A. Lib. 420 [rubric]
cimiterium ecclesie de Markinch’ 1284 St A. Lib. 420 [see MAI Introduction]
terram arabilem de Markynch’ 1284 St A. Lib. 421 [see MAI Introduction]
apud Markyng’ 1284 St A. Lib. 421 [see MAI Introduction]
Ranulph<us> vicari<us> de Markynch’ 1284 St A. Lib. 421
Merkynche 1296 Stevenson, Documents ii, 30 [‘where this is only the minster and three houses’; see MAI Introduction, Physical Descriptions]
in cimiterio de Markynchs c.1250 x 1340 Dunf. Reg. no. 326 [see MAI Introduction, Markinch Cemetery]
(lands of Neutone and of) Markinche 1393 RMS i no. 870 [Robert Earl of Fife to Sir John of Wemyss; here the Newton (Neutone) probably refers to Newton WMS]
(Master John Feldew vicar of) Markynch 1420 St A. Cop. no. 25
(church of) Markynche c.1420 St A. Lib. 413
Markinche 1451 ER v p.469 [see Newton MAI]
Eister Markinch 1491 NAS GD26/3/796 [17th c. copy (1649)]
Wester Merkinch 1492 RMS ii no. 2303 [John Lord Lindsay of Byres to his brother Patrick Lindsay of Kirkforthir, ‘lands of Wester Merkinch on both south and north sides of the Leven’ (terras de Wester Merkinch tam ex australi quam ex boreali partibus aque de Levin existen.)]
Westir Markinch 1508 RMS ii no. 3274 [Patrick Lord Lindsay of Byres, lands or lordship of Wester Markinch, on both south and north sides of the Leven, with mills etc.]
Over-Markinch 1511 RMS ii no. 3642 [to Henry Wardlaw, with lands of Brunton (Burntoun) etc. in lordship of Dalginch (Dalginche) KWY]
(John Multrar of) Merkinch 1512 RMS ii no. 3738 [lands of Easter Markinch (Est-Markinch), Nether Markinch (Nethir-Markinch) in lordship of Dalginch (Dalginche) KWY, feued to John Multrar (Multrare) by Henry Wardlaw]
Est-Markinch 1512 RMS ii no. 3738 [see preceding entry]
Nethir-Markinch 1512 RMS ii no. 3738 [see preceding entries]
(Robert Hog in) Markinsche 1518 Fife Ct. Bk. 102
Markinch Easter c.1560 s Purves 155
Markinch Wester c.1560 s Purves 155
Merkinsche 1588 RMS v no. 1431 [to James Lindsay ... the lands of Markinch with grain- and waulkmills (cum molendinis granorum et fullonum)]
terras ecclesiasticas de Markinsch 1593 RMS v no. 2273 col. 5 [‘kirklands of Markinch’, among St Andrews Priory lands]
(parish church of) Markinche 1593 RMS v no. 2273 col. 6
(lands of) Markinche 1606 Cunningham 1907a, 9 [see Brunton KWY, above]
Newtoun de Markinche 1609 Retours (Fife) no. 205 [see following entries]
Eister Markinche 1609 Retours (Fife) no. 205 [see following entry]
Nether Markinche 1609 Retours (Fife) no. 205 [Henry Multrar (Moultray) of Seafield (Seyfield) KGH, Nether Markinche, Pitenchagal # (Pittinhagillis) MAI, Inchinnie # (Inshehome) MAI, Bighty (Bichtie) MAI and 6 acres of Dalginch (Dalginche) KWY]
parochia de Merkinsche 1627 RMS viii no. 1162
Eister Merkinsche 1627 RMS viii no. 1162 [‘Eister Merkinsche alias Kirktoun de Merkinsche’]
Kirktoun de Merkinsche 1627 RMS viii no. 1162 [‘Eister Merkinsche alias Kirktoun de Merkinsche’]
Nather Merkinsche 1627 RMS viii no. 1162
(lands of) Markinchlaw 1635 RMS ix no. 338 [to Alexander Leslie of Balgonie lands of Lochtiesyde, Mylnetoun de Balgonie ... lands of Spittell, Markinchlaw ]
Kirktoun de Markinsch 1635 RMS ix no. 307
kirk of Markinche 1636 Stevenson 1900, 101
(lands of) Merkinsche 1648 RMS ix no. 1939
N<ether> Markinch 1642 Gordon MS Fife
Markinch K<irk> 1642 Gordon MS Fife
Markinch 1654 Blaeu (Pont) East Fife
Markinche K[irk] 1654 Blaeu (Gordon) Fife
N<ether> Markinche 1654 Blaeu (Gordon) Fife
Nether Markinch 1667 RMS xi no. 1074
Over Markinch 1667 RMS xi no. 1074
(parish of) Merkinch 1667 RMS xi no. 1074
(parish of) Merkinshe 1667 RMS xi no. 1091
(parish of) Markinche 1668 RMS xi no. 1201
totas et integras villam et terras de Markinsh 1685 NAS GD26/3/950 [to David Melville (Melvill), ‘all and hail the toun and lands of Markinch’]
villam et terras de lie Over vel Easter Markynsh nuncupatas 1685 NAS GD26/3/950 [as above, ‘toun and lands called Over or Easter Markinch’]
Kirk Markinsh 1685 NAS GD26/3/950 [to David Melville]
Neather Markinsh 1685 NAS GD26/3/950
Markinshmilne seu Midlemilne 1685 NAS GD26/3/950 [‘Markinch Mill or Middle Mill’]
Markinchland 1685 NAS GD26/3/950
Merkinch 1753 Roy sheet 18, 1
Markinch 1775 Ainslie/Fife
Wester Markinch 1775 Ainslie/Fife
Over Markinch 1799 Sasines no. 5328 [see following; also discussion]
Easter Markinch 1799 Sasines no. 5328 [see following; also discussion]
Kirk Markinch 1799 Sasines no. 5328 [‘Over and Easter Markinch called Kirk Markinch’]
Markinch Mill 1799 Sasines no. 5328 [‘Mill called Markinch Mill or Middle Mill’; Middle Mill is shown on OS 6 inch (1856) at NO293010, between West Mill and Sythrum Mill]
Kirk Markinch 1807 Sasines no. 7812 [Mary Landale, ‘eighth part of the town and lands of Easter Markinch called Kirk Markinch, Pittenhaigle, and Inchany’]
Markinch 1828 SGF
W. Markinch 1828 SGF
Wester Markinch 1856 OS 6 inch 1st edn [at NO291017]

G marc + G innis

‘Horse-inch or haugh’. The fact that it shares the same generic with the important early place of legal assembly, Dalginch KWY, MAI (see MAI Introduction, above), which lies immediately east of Markinch, is certainly significant, and the two names should be interpreted together.

    Dalginch KWY, MAI comes from G dealg ‘thorn’ + G innis. It means a piece of land marked out from its surroundings by a thorn-hedge, probably with reference to the area within which the legal proceedings would take place. For a similar combination of thorn-bush and place of legal assembly, compare Coldrain, Fossoway KNR (formerly Tullibole FIF), analysed by Barrow (1981, 15). Also for ‘inch’ used for a place of assembly, see Threipinch # SCO (or WMS), noted in Elements Index under innis.

    Dalginch was a centre of legal assembly for places up to 32 km away. Obviously people would come to it on horse-back.[238] This would of course regularly mean a high concentration of horses at Markinch for periods lasting days if not weeks at a time. It is in this context that the name ‘horse-inch’ may well have arisen. Also during these times the horses would have raced against each other, since horse-races were a feature of public assemblies (Kelly 1997, 99). The horses would have been kept enclosed not merely to prevent theft or straying, but also because it was usual practice to keep horses by themselves on separate pasture (Watson 1904, 86; Kelly 1997, 93). It should also be borne in mind that G marc denotes a steed or charger i.e. the kind of horse that members of the gentry would own, rather than capall, the work-horse, or each, the generic term. The number of horses at Markinch at such times would also have been augmented by those horses about which there was legal dispute (to be settled at Dalginch), or which had been poinded.

    Thus the element innis echoes the generic in nearby Dalginch, with the same meaning of land rising out of or above a body of water or a bog. Markinch could well have originally referred to the whole piece of raised land on which the church and original settlement sits, which was almost entirely surrounded by bog until drainage of the surrounding land in the modern period.[239]

    The main divisions of the lands of Markinch are (or were) Easter, Wester, Over, Nether and Newton. Only Newton has survived (q.v.). The name Wester Markinch first appears in 1492. Its lands and lordship (held by the Lindsays of Byres) lay on both sides of the Leven (RMS ii nos. 2303, 3274). By 1775 Ainslie/Fife shows Wester Markinch as a small settlement inside the southern boundary of Balbirnie estate, beside the road which skirts it, while by 1856 (OS 6 inch 1st edn) the name had come to apply only to ‘A few cottages at the South entrance to Balbirnie House’ (OS Name Book 92, 11). Over Markinch, first mentioned in 1511, is associated with the lands of Brunton MAI and, along with Easter and Nether Markinch, lay in the lordship of Dalginch KWY, MAI (RMS ii nos. 3642, 3738). Easter Markinch applied to what later became the town of Markinch, the settlement around the parish kirk, hence the alternative name *Kirkton of Markinch (1627 RMS viii no. 1162 Eister Merkinsche alias Kirktoun de Merkinsche). That Over Markinch was closely associated with Easter Markinch is seen in the 1799 Sasine entry, which implies that both Over and Easter Markinch were known together as Kirk Markinch (Sasines no. 5328).[240]

    /mark ɪntʃ/ or ˈmarkɪntʃ/

This place-name appeared in printed volume 2