Largo Law

Largo Law LAR R NO42750 1 374 290m

apud montem de Largauch’ 1306 Dunf. Reg. no. 590 [NBN Introduction, Med. Marches no. 2]
montis de Knock 1306 Dunf. Reg. no. 590 [followed by a gap, possibly for *Knocklargauch; NBN Introduction, Med. Marches no. 2]
Knoklargauch c.1335 Dunf. Reg. no. 335 [NBN Introduction, Med. Marches no. 4]
Largolaw 1542 NAS C2.28 no. 305 [NBN Introduction, Med. Marches no. 5]
Largo law 1654 Blaeu (Pont) East Fife
Largow Law 1654 Blaeu (Gordon) Fife
Largo Law 1753 Roy sheet 18, 1
Largo Law 1775 Ainslie/Fife

en Largo + Sc law

The highest and most conspicuous land-mark in this part of Fife, it is clear from the early forms that a name containing a G generic (cnoc ‘hill’), and with the more usual G structure, having the generic element in first position, was replaced in the later medieval or early modern period by a Sc name containing a Sc generic (law ‘(conspicuous) hill’) and with Sc structure, having the generic element in second position. It is unusual to see cnoc being applied to such a large hill. For further discussion, see Elements Glossary, PNF 5.

    The author of OSA (570) is of course in error in suggesting that it is called Largo Law from a Sc word for ‘flame’ (actually low), but provides the interesting detail that several proclamations of the Privy Council of Scotland order fires to be kindled on Largo Law as beacons warning of the approach of enemy ships.

This place-name appeared in printed volume 2