Glasslie

Glasslie FAL S NO237051 3 280m

Glasle 1431 NLS MS Adv. 15.1.18 no. 95 [John Chambers (de Camera) of Glasslie]
Johannes de Camera de Glasle 1435 St A. Lib. 418 [John Chambers]
terras quarte partis terrarum de Glaslee 1481 x 1482 RMS ii no. 1500 [Agnes Chambers (Chaumer) widow of the late Alexander Tarvit (Tarvate) of that ilk, and lady of a quarter of the lands of Glasslie (Glaslee), sold to Walter Heriot burgess of Cupar, and his heirs, ‘the lands of a quarter of the lands of Glasslie’]
(quarter of) Glaslie 1512 RMS ii no. 3742 [part of the barony of Burnturk KTT erected in favour of Walter Heriot]
ferd part of the landis of Glasly 1521 Fife Ct. Bk. 236 [‘fourth part’; Sibbald]
quarta parte terrarum de Gleslie 1544 Retours (Fife) no. 3 [Walter Grundiston (Grundestoun) in a quarter part of the lands of Glasslie]
(quarter of) Glaslie 1556 RMS iv no. 1147 [to Heriots]
(quarter of) Glasly 1557 Retours (Fife) no. 30 [David Sibbald]
quarta parte terrarum de Glaslie 1575 x 1621 RMS viii no. 215 [quarter of the lands of Glasslie]
(quarter of) Glaslie 1577 RMS iv no. 2683 [to Heriots]
Glaslie 1587 Assumption 15 [rental of teind sheaves of St Andrews Priory, kirk of Kilgour]
(half of the lands and toun of) Glaslie 1590 RMS v no. 1799 [dimidietas terrarum et ville de Glasuell, alias abusive vocat<arum> Glaslie (half of the lands and toun of Glaswell otherwise wrongly called Glasslie)]
Glaslie 1592 RMS v no. 2186 [Glaswell alias abusive vocat. Glaslie]
(portioner of) Glasly 1602 RMS vi no. 1349
Glaslie 1620 Retours (Fife) no. 309 [to George Leslie of Newton (Newtoun) FGN, two quarters extending to half of the lands and toun of Glaswell alias Abusuie, (which lands are) called Glasslie, with common pasture in the lands of Lomonds (Lowmonds); see discussion]
(half of) Glaslie 1634 RMS ix no. 14
Dlessly 1654 Blaeu (Gordon) Fife [Gordon MS Fife (1642) shows the same strange form]
E. Glasslie 1815 RHP489
W. Glasslie 1815 RHP489
Easter Glasslie 1856 OS 6 inch 1st edn
Wester Glasslie 1856 OS 6 inch 1st edn

? Pictish * glas + ? Pictish * - le

This name may be Pictish. The first element is probably P- and Q-Celtic glas ‘green’; the second element may be the suffix –le meaning ‘place of’, found in Welsh names, and therefore by implication Pictish rather than Gaelic (Watson 1926, 420). The meaning would then be ‘green place’. Given its relatively high location on the south-west side of East Lomond (Falkland) Hill, the element glas probably refers to its good grazing potential (see also Green Hill FAL, below). However, the field of Damdub, which lies a short distance north-west of the Glasslies, is described by the OS Name Book in the early 1850s as primarily arable land (q.v.).

    The strange name Abusuie, connected with the farm of Glasslie, which Liddall (1896 , s.n.) claims derives from ‘abbacy’, is found in 1620 (Retours (Fife) no. 309) as ‘half of the lands and toun of Glaswell alias Abusuie, (which lands are) called Glasslie’ (dimidietatem terrarum et villae de Glaswell alias Abusuie, vocatis Glaslie). However, it is clear from earlier entries in RMS that Abusuie is in fact the result of a scribal or editorial misreading of the Latin abusive ‘wrongly’ (e.g. dimidietas terrarum et ville de Glasuell, alias abusive vocat<arum> Glaslie 1590 RMS v no. 1799; Glaswell alias abusive vocat. Glaslie 1592 RMS v no. 2186). Despite this assertion that it was ‘wrongly called Glasslie’, Glasslie does in fact seem to be the older name, appearing first (as Glasle) in 1431 (NLS MS Adv. 15.1.18 no. 95), whereas Glaswell does not appear until 1590, and has not survived.

    It appears on OS Pathf. as Easter Glasslie and Wester Glasslie, which lie close to one another on the road from Falkland to Leslie.

    /ˈglaslɪ/ or /ˈglasli/ locally /ˈglɛslɪ/[72]

This place-name appeared in printed volume 2